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25 August 2014
Vol. IV, No. 216

 

From The Editor: This last week of August, 2014, Weekly Hubris revisits “the tomato” with Diana Farr Louis (currently surrounded by the luscious fruits and preparing them for winter use in her kitchen on the Greek island of Andros). We also feature a long, meticulously-researched essay on the early years of the European presence in North America, wherein Dr. William Ramp—most readably and poetically—breaks new ground. Your editor contributes an Op/Ed piece registering her own shock at the deaths, in August, of Michael Brown, Robin Williams, and BKS Iyengar. And Skip Eisiminger, aka “The Wordspinner,” ponders the phenomenon of leadership among homo sapiens. Please also be sure, while here,  to click through to information regarding our magazine’s fall writing contest: just click on “Contest” on our Home Page’s Contents Bar for all the details and rules. We wish you all a warm end of summer, and a productive autumn but, for now, read on . . . .

Alexander, leading from amidst and among.

Alexander, leading from amidst and among.

Skip the B.S.

“Bow Waves & Propellers: Leadership” By Skip Eisiminger 

CLEMSON South Carolina—(Weekly Hubris)—8/25/2014—Examining a wartime photograph of Gen. Erwin Rommel with his shoulder to his staff-car fender helping his men extricate it from the mud, I thought . . . this is a picture that ought to be on every leader’s desk. I was reminded of the photograph when I heard Dr. Jim Barker, president of the school where I once taught, tell a group of faculty about his first night on the job. (Read more . . .)

We must continue reflecting on one of our greatest national tragedies, the squandering and debasement of young men of color.

We must continue reflecting on one of our greatest national tragedies, the squandering and debasement of young men of color.

Ruminant With A View

“Three Deaths in August: Michael Brown, Robin Williams & BKS Iyengar” By Elizabeth Boleman-Herring

BRIDGE & TUNNEL New Jersey—(Weekly Hubris)—8/25/2014—Each and every day on our planet, 154,957 of us, give or take, die (a number derived from data gleaned between 2012 and 2014 by the CIA, the World Bank, the UN World Population Study, and the US Census). On August 9, at the age of 18, one of us died of bullet wounds in Ferguson, Missouri. On August 11, a suicide at age 63, one of us died at his home in Paradise Cay, California. (Read more . . .)

Small buildings under a vast sky, adrift on a terrestrial sea.

Small buildings under a vast sky, adrift on a terrestrial sea.

Small Things Recollected

“Reason’s Ghosts: The Settling & Unsettling of The Plains” By William Ramp

LETHBRIDGE Alberta, Canada—(Weekly Hubris)—8/25/2014—Last month, I wrote about the thousands of years of cultural continuity which still bind past, present and future together for the first peoples of the North American plains, despite all the cultural and other damage visited on them over the past 200 years. This month, I will turn over that first thin shard of time during which Europeans pushed into the North American interior, looking at the light it casts, the figures it refracts, and the shadows it leaves.  (Read more . . .)

Tomatoes drying in the sun on our terrace. You might think of them as tomato-flavored chewing gum, but what a sun-burst of taste in winter.

Tomatoes drying in the sun on our terrace. You might think of them as tomato-flavored chewing gum, but what a sun-burst of taste in winter.

Eating Well Is The Best Revenge

“Give Us This Day Our Daily Tomato” By Diana Farr Louis

ANDROS Greece—(Weekly Hubris)—8/25/2014—I don’t think a day has gone by in the past three months that tomatoes haven’t been part of at least one meal if not two here. Lunch is invariably a tomato salad, with or without trimmings—onions, peppers, purslane, basil, capers, but not cukes, which stay neither crisp nor cool when mixed with the rest. Or so my husband, “Joy of the People,” maintains. And I oblige, unless the salad is liquid, as in gazpacho.   (Read more . . .)

Silly Furniture Blockade

The doggone days of summer.

Won Over By Reality

“The Dog Days of Summer” By Tim Bayer

BRIGHTON New York—(Weekly Hubris)—8/18/2014—It doesn’t happen very often but, every once in a while, I get an email (yes, an actual email: that antique genre) that makes me laugh. I received just such an email last week and thought it good enough to include in/as my column.   (Read more . . .)

The villanelle: as constraining and as elegant as a corset.

The villanelle: as constraining and as elegant as a corset.

Ruminant With A View

“So, Write a Villanelle a Day & Check Out of the Sickery” By Elizabeth Boleman-Herring

BRIDGE & TUNNEL New Jersey—(Weekly Hubris)—8/18/2014—In 1958, George Benjamin Woods’ 28-page chapbook, Versification in English Poetry, first published in 1936, was reissued (in a revised edition) by Scott, Foresman and Company . . . at about the same time I was studying penmanship and Time for Poetry, compiled by May Hill Arbuthnot, at Pasadena Town & Country School. (Read more . . .)

“August, Popponesset Spit,” Oil on Canvas, 24” X 30” (2007).

“August, Popponesset Spit,” Oil on Canvas, 24” X 30” (2007).

The Disappearing Land

“Mid-Summer Haze” By Meredith d’Ambrosio

DUXBURY Massachusetts—(Weekly Hubris)—8/18/2014—Haydn and I would sail the daysailer from our Daniels Island cottage on the Ockway Bay side of the island, our Chocolate Lab, Clifford Brown, at the prow: he had a great sense of balance as he stood against the wind. At the northern point of the island, we would maneuver the boat into Popponesset Bay, a large salt water bay where, if we were not careful, we would often run into shallow water.  (Read more . . .)

Faces of Cuba XI.

Faces of Cuba XI.

Out of Santorini

“Faces of Cuba, Portfolio II” By Doris Athanassakis

IMEROVIGLI, Santorini, Greece—(Weekly Hubris)—8/18/2014—Note: This portfolio of  images represents the fifth offering of works by photographer Doris Athanassakis at Weekly Hubris. Athanassakis lives in Imerovigli,  a caldera-side village on the volcanic island of  Santorini. Of Greek and Austrian heritage, Athanassakis has been photographing her island home, its architecture, and its myriad residents, all her life. Her work comprises an ongoing and lifelong meditation upon her stunningly unique surroundings . . . and herself in them. During the Greek winters, Athanassakis travels the world, with her camera, and this and the portfolio that follows document her visit to Cuba. (All Athanassakis’s works are for sale, in limited edition archival prints: please contact her regarding gallery sales through her Weekly Hubris email address: athanassakis@gmx.at.) (Read more . . .)

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