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27 October 2014
Vol. IV, No. 225

From The Editor: Tis autumn (in one hemisphere, that is). This week-in-October, we hear from San Francisco Reiki Master and playwright Helen Noakes, who closes her eyes, breathes deeply, and takes herself (and us) back to the fearsome traditions of her childhood in China and Japan. From Greek/Austrian photographer Doris Athanassakis, we receive an Indian-Summer-portfolio of images from the still-sunny far south of Greece. And, from painter and jazz singer/composer Meredith d’Ambrosio, we are graced with an exhibition of paintings from New England in fall. Tis, all in all, a remarkable week here at Weekly Hubris. Readers, share widely, and do write in with comments for Helen, Doris, and Meredith on our site: www.WeeklyHubris.com . . . .

Santorini Wallpaper I

Santorini Wallpaper I

Out of Santorini

“Santorini Wallpaper” By Doris Athanassakis

IMEROVIGLI Santorini Greece—(Weekly Hubris)—10/27/14—This portfolio of  images represents yet another offering via Weekly Hubris of works by photographer Doris Athanassakis. Here, the photographer turns her lens on elements of her analog and demotic world, focusing on the architectural elements and whitewash that are Santorini’s visual signature. Athanassakis lives in Imerovigli,  a caldera-side village on the volcanic island of  Santorini. Of Greek and Austrian heritage, Athanassakis has been photographing her island home, its architecture, and its myriad residents, all her life. Her work comprises an ongoing and lifelong meditation upon her stunningly unique surroundings . . . and herself in them. (All Athanassakis’s works are for sale, in limited edition archival prints: please contact her regarding gallery sales through her Weekly Hubris email address: athanassakis@gmx.at.) (Read more . . .)

Oni mask.

Oni mask.

Waking Point

“Fright Night” By Helen Noakes

SAN FRANCISCO California—(Weekly Hubris)—10/27/14—I knew nothing about Halloween until we moved to the United States from Japan, and the whole business of dressing up in scary costumes to wander from door to door begging for candy seemed very strange, to say the least. Since I was a mature woman of 14, I decided that the whole thing was ridiculous but, at the same time, inexplicably compelling. So, when the night finally arrived, I donned a ratty old kimono and made up my face to look like the scariest of all scary witches, Obake. (Read more . . .)

“Round Pond Cranberry Bog,” Oil on Canvas, 24” X 36” (2014).

“Round Pond Cranberry Bog,” Oil on Canvas, 24” X 36” (2014).

The Disappearing Land

“Indian Summer” By Meredith d’Ambrosio

DUXBURY Massachusetts—(Weekly Hubris)—10/27/2014—After the dry-picking, when the tall plants and poison ivy bordering the pond next to the bog lose their bright red and orange hues, it is time to flood the bog for harvesting. The water is taken from the pond and pumped into the bogs from the pump house until the cranberries float. I was astounded the first time I saw the brightly colored berries floating atop the water, bathed in the bright sunlight, aflame in a sea of coral. (Read more . . .)

Making light of rural drudgery: riding the clothesline.

Making light of rural drudgery: riding the clothesline.

Small Things Recollected

“Forgotten Commonwealths: Agrarian Legacies & Lessons” By  William Ramp

LETHBRIDGE Alberta, Canada—(Weekly Hubris)—10/20/2014—It seems that to be human in the modern era is to live in contradiction and to dream of transcendence. This month, I will tell a tale about dreams, visions, voices and acts which kindled these elements into a fire that blazed across the North American interior a hundred years ago. (Read more . . .)

The Donner Party.

The Donner Party.

Squibs & Blurbs

“Life & Death in The Sierra Nevadas” By  Jerry Zimmerman

TEANECK New Jersey—(Weekly Hubris)—10/20/2014—I am standing in a small museum looking at one of the most beautiful hand-made objects I’ve ever seen. It is a very large one-man ice saw. The blade is about five feet long, tapered to a blunt point and made of steel. It has surprisingly uniform hand-cut teeth along the working edge. Attached to the wide end is a sensually arched steel bar that ends in wooden handles for a worker’s hands. It takes command of an impressively large space for a hand tool. Made in the late 1800s, not only is it an exquisite object in its own right, it is also an amazing testament to the toolmaker’s creativity and skill, an amalgam of brute force and delicate workmanship. (Read more . . .)

View of the Aegean, with pomegranates.

View of the Aegean, with pomegranates.

Eating Well Is The Best Revenge

“An Eagle, Three Hares & A Sea Turtle: Reflections On The Summer” By  Diana Farr Louis

ANDROS Greece—(Weekly Hubris)—10/20/2014—I sat down to write a column about our five days in Provence this July and found it wouldn’t come. Instead, on returning to Andros after ten days in Athens, the present whooshed in, pushing memories to the side, to the back burner. (Read more . . .)

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