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20 October 2014
Vol. IV, No. 224

From The Editor: As Publishing-Editor of Weekly Hubris, I cannot overstate the importance, in terms of sheer scholarship, of sociologist Dr. William Ramp’s essays for us these past several months. But I also assure you they are eminently readable as well, and poignant, their subject being our shared (Canada’s and the United States’) Great Plains, their settlement and traditions. Please do not miss Bill Ramp’s groundbreaking work. In related writing, New Jersey’s Sensei Jerry Zimmerman writes about a recent “encounter” with the ill-fated Donner Party, many of whom perished in 1846, in California’s snowbound Sierra Nevada Mountains, on their trek west from Illinois. Diana Farr Louis, on a much, much lighter note, writes from the Greek island of Andros about the timeless delights of an Aegean summer . . . and shares an equally timeless recipe for Lentil Salad. Some great writing here, for our great readers!

Making light of rural drudgery: riding the clothesline.

Making light of rural drudgery: riding the clothesline.

Small Things Recollected

“Forgotten Commonwealths: Agrarian Legacies & Lessons” By  William Ramp

LETHBRIDGE Alberta, Canada—(Weekly Hubris)—10/20/2014—It seems that to be human in the modern era is to live in contradiction and to dream of transcendence. This month, I will tell a tale about dreams, visions, voices and acts which kindled these elements into a fire that blazed across the North American interior a hundred years ago. (Read more . . .)

The Donner Party.

The Donner Party.

Squibs & Blurbs

“Life & Death in The Sierra Nevadas” By  Jerry Zimmerman

TEANECK New Jersey—(Weekly Hubris)—10/20/2014—I am standing in a small museum looking at one of the most beautiful hand-made objects I’ve ever seen. It is a very large one-man ice saw. The blade is about five feet long, tapered to a blunt point and made of steel. It has surprisingly uniform hand-cut teeth along the working edge. Attached to the wide end is a sensually arched steel bar that ends in wooden handles for a worker’s hands. It takes command of an impressively large space for a hand tool. Made in the late 1800s, not only is it an exquisite object in its own right, it is also an amazing testament to the toolmaker’s creativity and skill, an amalgam of brute force and delicate workmanship. (Read more . . .)

View of the Aegean, with pomegranates.

View of the Aegean, with pomegranates.

Eating Well Is The Best Revenge

“An Eagle, Three Hares & A Sea Turtle: Reflections On The Summer” By  Diana Farr Louis

ANDROS Greece—(Weekly Hubris)—10/20/2014—I sat down to write a column about our five days in Provence this July and found it wouldn’t come. Instead, on returning to Andros after ten days in Athens, the present whooshed in, pushing memories to the side, to the back burner. (Read more . . .)

Mid-century child, Chicago; and the dreaded Buster Browns.

Mid-century child, Chicago; and the dreaded Buster Browns.

More Light

“Stargazing (& Shopping for Shoes) with My Mother” By  Jean Carroll Nolan

SEASIDE California—(Weekly Hubris)—10/13/2014—When I was a little girl, autumn meant school, and school meant new shoes, and new shoes meant a trip to Marshall Field’s, on State Street, and a visit with Miss Nightingale, the frightening guardian of the Children’s Shoe Department. (Read more . . .)

The Philippines and Pacific Theater.

The Philippines and Pacific Theater.

Dispatches from The Esso Club

“William A Balk, Sr.’s “Wartime Experiences of a Colorblind Navy Pilot-6”” By  Ted Balk

CENTRAL South Carolina—(Weekly Hubris)—10/13/2014—

CHAPTER III
The Invasion of Leyte

By October 2, the Marines had established their own air support group on Peleliu with a squadron of F4U Corsairs, so we were granted a brief respite with a trip to the anchorage at Manus Island in the Admiralty group. While the ship took on fuel, supplies, aviation gasoline, and ammunition, the pilots could spend a few days ashore relaxing. (Read more . . .)

Sacred cows make the best hamburger.

Sacred cows make the best hamburger.

Skip The B.S.

“Levitating the Pentagon: Rebellion” By  Skip Eisiminger

CLEMSON South Carolina—(Weekly Hubris)—10/13/2014—In 1967, Abbie Hoffman and hundreds of fellow anti-war protesters encircled the Pentagon in a mock-ceremonious exorcism. Hoffman’s plan was to lift that squat office building 300 feet, give it a whirl, and toss out the demons but, after he was arrested for littering, the GSO administrator told Hoffman he was only authorized to lift it ten feet. Nevertheless, several of the protestors (on LSD, like their leader) claimed to see it rise out of sight. Others saw it sink into Foggy Bottom. (Read more . . .)

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