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25 April 2016
Vol. VI, No. 283

From Elizabeth Boleman-Herring: This week, we feature essays by a New Yorker living in Athens, Greece (and a New Yorker living in Kissimmee, Florida), a Greek living in Chicago (but writing about Greece), and an American-Greek living somewhere (she won’t specify) in north-central Florida, and writing about the end of human life on earth. (Well, north-central Florida is “God’s waiting room.”) Please join us to meet one of Diana Farr Louis’s favorite authors, Thea Halo; consider (with Sanford Rose) what it means to have (and have not) in Orange County, Florida; pull up a chair for a humble meal in Thessaloniki with Alexander Billinis; and learn how John Keats (and Elizabeth Kolbert) both influenced your publisher, Elizabeth Boleman-Herring. (This week, all of us at Weekly Hubris send our love to contributing photographer Doris Athanassakis upon the loss of her husband Vassilis. Take a moment to look back at Doris’s many beautiful posts to our online -zine, the images all deriving from her and Vassilis’s home island, Santorini.)

Thea Halo, author of “Not Even My Name.”

Thea Halo, author of “Not Even My Name.”

Eating Well Is The Best Revenge

“Meetings With Remarkable Women: Thea Halo & Her Mother” By Diana Farr Louis

ATHENS Greece—(Weekly Hubris)—4/25/2016—How often do you really get to heroes, or heroines? You can watch them perform on stage, glimpse them across a crowded room, or listen to them give a lecture. I was a speck in the audience when favorite writers of mine such as Mark Mazower, Margaret Atwood, Derek Walcott, and A. B. Yehoshua graced Athens with a visit. But to actually sit in someone’s living room with an author you admire, ask her questions, and look into her eyes with only another 15 or so people present is a rare and precious gift. (Read more . . .)

Outside the gated community.

Outside the gated community.

Dolors & Sense

“Growing Up in Orange County (Florida) Sucks” By Sanford Rose

KISSIMMEE Florida—(Weekly Hubris)—4/25/2016—The realtor’s mantra of “location, location, location” does not just refer to the value of your house. It also relates to your kid’s chances of escaping poverty. To be sure, poverty begets poverty. But it is not the sole determinant. Much depends on where in the US you grow up poor. Children of poor parents in some parts of the country exhibit strikingly greater upward-income mobility than do those in other parts of the country. (Read more . . .)

George Frederick Watts’s “Endymion,” c. 1872.

George Frederick Watts’s “Endymion,” c. 1872.

By Way of Being

“From Keats through Kolbert: I’m Still Writing Poetry” By Elizabeth Boleman-Herring

PETIT TRIANON Florida—(Weekly Hubris)—4/25/2016—There could not be, I hazard, two sensibilities as disparate as my own and that of the late-18th-century Romantic poet, John Keats. Keats was a major poet of wonder and discovery, for whom beauty was truth, and truth, beauty. I am a very minor poet of 21st-century horror and grief, for whom the fact of climate change or, less euphemistically, the coming, certain extinction of mankind on our planet, is the truth that dooms all beauty (as it dooms all those who conceived the concept). (Read more . . .)

The eternal Greek salad, or “horiatiki.”

The eternal Greek salad, or “horiatiki.”

Roaming East Roman

“Thessaloniki Comfort Food” By Alexander Billinis

CHICAGO Illinois—(Weekly Hubris)—4/25/2016—It had been a long day and, as is often the case when traveling in Greece, a frustrating one. No doubt for my then six-year-old son, sweating in his new PAOK soccer shirt in the late August heat, it had been even more frustrating. After enduring a KTEL bus trip from Kavala to Thessaloniki the day before, he’d been dragged by his father through the Byzantine monuments of Greece’s northern “capital” and then on to drinks, meze (starters), and dinner in the Ladadika district: my little boy was frazzled. (Read more . . .)

Donald Trump in Manchester, New Hampshire, February 8, 2016.

Donald Trump in Manchester, New Hampshire, February 8, 2016.

Small Things Recollected

“An Admonition” By William Ramp

LETHBRIDGE Alberta—(Weekly Hubris)—4/4/2016— I have been AWOL from Weekly Hubris for some months, nursing a persistent case of writer’s block, a malady rarely traceable to a single cause, and not easily curable by cruelly-optimistic techniques that make the rounds on social media. In my case, the perilously dim geopolitical, economic and survival prospects of the global climate and international politics haven’t helped.  (Read more . . .)

IDS, the Anti-Robin-Hood.

IDS, the Anti-Robin-Hood.

The Polemicist

“Front-Page News in the UK: Bad to Worse” By Michael House, FRGS

KINGS SUTTON England—(Weekly Hubris)—4/4/2016—The Belgian Islamic atrocities came at a bad time for the Left in Britain. They were predictable, of course. A religion that built its dominance on violence and conquest, whose holy book requires the death of apostates and gays and the oppression of women and unbelievers, is bound to spawn vermin who will slaughter indiscriminately in revenge for the arrest of one of their own. It is hoped that one day Islam will experience its own Reformation, although any latter-day Martin Luther who nails 95 theses on the door of a mosque will probably find himself, as well, nailed to said door. (Read more . . .)

Out of The Blue XXIV

Out of The Blue XXIV

Out of Santorini

“Out of The Blue, Part III” By Doris Athanassakis

SANTORINI Greece—(Weekly Hubris)—4/4/2016—This portfolio of  images represents yet another offering via Weekly Hubris of works by photographer Doris Athanassakis. Athanassakis spends much of her year in Imerovigli,  a caldera-side village on the volcanic island of Santorini. Of Greek and Austrian heritage, Athanassakis has been photographing her island home, its architecture, and its human and feline residents, all her life. Her work comprises an ongoing and lifelong meditation upon her stunningly unique surroundings . . . and herself in them. (Read more . . .)

The upper reaches of Everest are known as the Death Zone.

The upper reaches of Everest are known as the Death Zone.

Skip the B.S.

“Stealing Home with One Foot on Third: Risk” By Skip Eisiminger

CLEMSON South Carolina—(Weekly Hubris)—4/4/2016—A bright fifth-grader once told me that she could see the world’s tallest mountain from her home in Nepal, so I asked her, “Do you know who was the first to climb Everest?” “Tenzing Norgay!” she said proudly. “I’ve seen his statue in Darjeeling. But we call the mountain ‘Sagarmāthā’, not ‘Everest.’” “Sorry,” I said. “Have you ever heard of Sir Edmund Hillary?” “No, Sir,” she said as innocently as any Westerner who’s forgotten Tenzing Norgay, Hillary’s Sherpa guide and porter. “Have you ever climbed Sagarmāthā?” I asked jokingly.  (Read more . . .)

See you later, Kevin.

See you later, Kevin.

Won Over By Reality

“Robotic Humor: Impressive & Funny” By Tim Bayer

BRIGHTON New York—(Weekly Hubris)—4/4/2016—I have two related videos for you this week, best viewed in sequence. The first is footage of a technically impressive bipedal robot; the second provides a very funny perspective on the first. (Read more . . .)

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