Harvest Time

Meredith d'Ambrosio

Meredith d’Ambrosio

“The following day, I revisited the scene hoping to find the horses back in their grassy field. I noticed that the pair never left each other’s side while grazing. I was surprised to find black sheep and goats getting along with one another in the same meadow.”—Meredith d’Ambrosio

The Disappearing Land

By Meredith d’Ambrosio

Meredith d'Ambrosio

DUXBURY Massachusetts—(Weekly Hubris)—10/12/2015—

“Young Clydesdales and Friend,” Oil on Linen, 24" x 36" (2015).

“Young Clydesdales and Friend,” Oil on Linen, 24″ x 36″ (2015).

Before the day’s end, I watched the Clydesdales slowly led together from the meadow through the open fence to return to their sleeping places in their barn near the meadow. The following day, I revisited the scene hoping to find the horses back in their grassy field. I noticed that the pair never left each other’s side while grazing. I was surprised to find black sheep and goats getting along with one another in the same meadow. A sense of peace washed over my body as I observed the scene. It seemed that as I was studying the goat, the goat was also studying me, staring quietly. I was amused by its comical expression.

“My North Hero,” Eggshell Mosaic, 23" X 29.5" (1975).

“My North Hero,” Eggshell Mosaic, 23″ X 29.5″ (1975).

I spent nine days sketching many scenes for eggshell mosaics on the middle island of Lake Champlain. North Hero is one of four towns on that island. I was attracted to the wagon, which sent silent messages to me of courage and loneliness.

“Bois De Boulogne,” Watercolor, 14.25″ X 21.25″ (1994).

“Bois De Boulogne,” Watercolor, 14.25″ X 21.25″ (1994).

This small area of the Bois de Boulogne is my favorite scene in the huge park set in Paris, France. The abstract designs formed by the elbows of the oak branches, and the peaceful afternoon, with lovers strolling lazily along the path, bring to mind the romantic quality the park projects.

 

Note: D’Ambrosio’s upcoming museum-exhibition will run from November 15, 2015 till February 14, 2016 at the Art Complex Museum of Duxbury MA. At the November 15 Reception, D’Ambrosio will be performing with jazz pianist Chris Taylor.

Meredith d'Ambrosio

About Meredith d'Ambrosio

Boston-born Meredith d’Ambrosio, a Renaissance woman whose creative work crosses many genres, has successfully combined careers in the musical and visual arts. In 1958, in Boston, d’Ambrosio began singing with small bands, accompanied by Roger Kellaway on piano. Although she has worked primarily as a jazz singer-pianist, she is also known internationally as a calligrapher, watercolorist, creator of eggshell mosaics, composer, lyricist, recording artist, and teacher. D’Ambrosio branched out into New York City in 1981 and, since then, has toured extensively throughout North America and Europe, performing with such musicians as Harold Danko, Bob Dorough, Dave Frishberg, Fred Hersch, Eddie Higgins, Dick Hyman, Hank Jones, Lee Musiker, Mike Renzi, Richard Wyands, Milt Hinton, Major Holley, Jay Leonhart, Michael Moore, George Mraz, Rufus Reid, Leroy Vinnegar, Buddy DeFranco, Harry Allen, Lee Konitz, Ken Peplowski, Phil Woods, Jack Sheldon, Al Grey, Johnny Frigo, Gene Bertoncini, Kevin Eubanks, Joe Ascione, Terry Clarke, Keith Copeland, Jake Hanna, Butch Miles and Ben Riley (view d’Ambrosio’s complete discography at www.meredithdambrosio.com). Currently working primarily in oils on canvas, d’Ambrosio is preparing for a major solo exhibition, November 2015 through February 2016, at the Art Complex Museum of Duxbury, Massachusetts. “Landscapes Of The North Countries” will comprise oils on canvas and linen, as well as watercolors, and include scenes from France, Italy, Switzerland, North America, and Canada, as well as new oils of Duxbury, commissioned by the museum. D’Ambrosio’s paintings, both watercolors and oils, may be viewed through www.meredithdambrosio.com, her multifaceted website, which covers her work as a musician, painter, and writer.
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