Winter Abides (Abiding Yet)

Meredith d'Ambrosio

Meredith d’Ambrosio

“Though I wore heavy mittens, my fingers grew numb as I sketched this foggy, snow-drizzly scene onto a thick piece of wood.”—Meredith d’Ambrosio

The Disappearing Land

By Meredith d’Ambrosio

Meredith d'AmbrosioDUXBURY Massachusetts—(Weekly Hubris)—2/23/2015—

 

“Verségères, Switzerland,” Watercolor, 28” X 22.5” (2000).

“Verségères, Switzerland,” Watercolor, 28” X 22.5” (2000).

After a concert tour in France and Holland with “Haydn” (Eddie Higgins, my late husband), we took a side trip to visit with my sister and family in Verbier, Switzerland. I asked her to take me back to the hamlet she had shown me on my previous visit. Here was an opportunity to keep a self-made promise to return one day to the quaint and fascinating village of Verségères, snuggled high in the Alps. We’d walked through the ancient streets the first time she took me. Everywhere I looked was a potential painting. The most compelling views were glimpsed through narrow spaces between the log houses where, peeking through, was the snow-covered valley; the alpine mountain above it disappearing into cloud. You have not seen the last of me yet, Verségères!

“Taos Winter,” Watercolor, 21.5” X 29.5” (2003).

“Taos Winter,” Watercolor, 21.5” X 29.5” (2003).

For three consecutive years, Haydn and I went to Taos Ski Valley, where he played for five nights at a jazz party held in the Thunderbird Lodge. During the day, we would trudge along snow-packed paths and roads and explore for possible painting scenes. This watercolor is one of two completed paintings from the upper valley resort.

“The Charles,” Eggshell Mosaic, 13” X 34.5” (1975).

“The Charles,” Eggshell Mosaic, 13” X 34.5” (1975).

Though I wore heavy mittens, my fingers grew numb as I sketched this foggy, snow-drizzly scene onto a thick piece of wood. Beyond the bridge was normally bustling Watertown Square, but all one could discern was the faint outline of trees beyond the river’s bank.

https://weeklyhubris.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/WingDing2-Char.jpg

Note: For more about Eddie Higgins, go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddie_Higgins.

Meredith d'Ambrosio

About Meredith d'Ambrosio

Boston-born Meredith d’Ambrosio, a Renaissance woman whose creative work crosses many genres, has successfully combined careers in the musical and visual arts. In 1958, in Boston, d’Ambrosio began singing with small bands, accompanied by Roger Kellaway on piano. Although she has worked primarily as a jazz singer-pianist, she is also known internationally as a calligrapher, watercolorist, creator of eggshell mosaics, composer, lyricist, recording artist, and teacher. D’Ambrosio branched out into New York City in 1981 and, since then, has toured extensively throughout North America and Europe, performing with such musicians as Harold Danko, Bob Dorough, Dave Frishberg, Fred Hersch, Eddie Higgins, Dick Hyman, Hank Jones, Lee Musiker, Mike Renzi, Richard Wyands, Milt Hinton, Major Holley, Jay Leonhart, Michael Moore, George Mraz, Rufus Reid, Leroy Vinnegar, Buddy DeFranco, Harry Allen, Lee Konitz, Ken Peplowski, Phil Woods, Jack Sheldon, Al Grey, Johnny Frigo, Gene Bertoncini, Kevin Eubanks, Joe Ascione, Terry Clarke, Keith Copeland, Jake Hanna, Butch Miles and Ben Riley (view d’Ambrosio’s complete discography at www.meredithdambrosio.com). Currently working primarily in oils on canvas, d’Ambrosio is preparing for a major solo exhibition, November 2015 through February 2016, at the Art Complex Museum of Duxbury, Massachusetts. “Landscapes Of The North Countries” will comprise oils on canvas and linen, as well as watercolors, and include scenes from France, Italy, Switzerland, North America, and Canada, as well as new oils of Duxbury, commissioned by the museum. D’Ambrosio’s paintings, both watercolors and oils, may be viewed through www.meredithdambrosio.com, her multifaceted website, which covers her work as a musician, painter, and writer.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Leave a Reply

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>